Transition Information and Programs

Special Education
What is Secondary Transition?

Secondary Transition is the process of preparing students for adult life after they leave high school. In PA, transition planning begins at the age of 14 or younger, if determined by the IEP team. As students consider their post-graduation goals, the transition process continues through high school with assessment, academic instruction, and community experiences to assist in clarifying the student’s goals. The entire process is based on individual student needs and taking into account each student’s strengths, preferences, and interests. Secondary Transition can be thought of as a bridge between school programs and the opportunities of adult life, including higher education or training, employment, independent living, and community participation.

PAWS(Pre College Academy at Penn State Worthington)

PAWSPAWS is an innovative Partnership with NEIU, Pennsylvania State University, and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR). It is funded through a grant from the Regional Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. The PAWS program is for senior students with special needs, who have a post school outcome of attending a two or four year college program. As part of their transition experience, the students attend nine half day sessions in a mock college experience. Classes at Penn State include a writing course and technology orientation with projects and presentation skills, a session with Office of Disability Services, and sessions on personal finance, stress management, career planning, and campus safety.

Victory Village (Vocational Instruction, Career Training Opportunity)

Victory VillageVictory Village is a 1, 2 or 3 year vocational training opportunity for students with special needs who have a post school outcome of competitive employment. It is located in a local community apartment and allows students to transfer skills previously taught to the natural environment of independent living or employment. The program enhances vocational skills through a variety of experiences in self-determination, job shadowing, community based vocational training, and daily living skills. Students attending Victory Village are introduced to local agencies to ensure a seamless transition to adulthood. Some of the local businesses that are partnering with Victory Village and aiding with vocational training are Riverfront, Penn Foster, Kevins, TJ Maxx, Genetti’s, and Dollar Tree. Victory Village is a half day program with am and pm sessions and takes 8 students per class. The pm class is for 3rd year students. Victory Village is located at 305 Church St. in Jessup.

CBVT (Community Based Vocational Training)

The CBVT program is a structured, supervised, hands on the job training program introduced in a community based setting. Students are introduced to a variety of half day training sites beginning in the third year or later of high school. Students must be at least 16 years of age. Students engage in activities related to IEP goals and objectives and in transition activities in employment, independent living and community access. The students have an on-site job coach provided by the NEIU.

Automotive Instructional Area

Automotive Instructional AreaThe Autoshop program is a 1, 2, or 3 year vocational program housed in a working setting. Autoshop has morning and afternoon session with each session having only 6-7 students. The program specializes in cultivations students’ technical skills to perform maintenance on automobile and small engine repair. Some of the maintenance skills taught and performed are: changing, balancing and rotating tires, car detailing, checking and changing all fluids, replacing shocks and struts, replacing brakes and pads, using the computer to look up parts and service information, evaluating condition of vehicles for inspection, performing engine tune-ups, trouble shooting and repairing electrical problems, and replacing steering, suspension, and exhaust components. The students also learn to identify the tools for auto maintenance and to follow safety rules for working in a garage.

Food Service Instructional Area

Food Service Instructional AreaThe Food Service Instructional Area provides instruction and practical skills in the different areas of the food service industry. There are morning and afternoon session with approximately 8 students in each session. The sessions can be 2, 3 or 5 days a week. The program focuses on the concepts, skills, and information needed to perform entry level tasks for a position in the food service industry.

SOAR

SOARSOAR (Students On Campus Achieving Results) SOAR is an innovative program, in a partnership with Marywood University for students 18 – 21 years old with a diagnosis of autism. It is a full day program and the students can attend 1 or 2 years. SOAR is designed to assist students to prepare for competitive employment. The students attend academic classes on campus with a special education teacher in the morning and participate in various community based vocational training throughout Marywood’s campus in the afternoon. In the classroom the students receive instruction in social skills, functional and financial math, functional literacy, and self-advocacy and determination skills.

The Cottage

The Cottage is prevocational program designed to provide younger students, ages 14 to 16 years old, with the necessary prerequisites for students to move seamlessly into a vocational program. The Cottage provides basic skills as well as exposure to a variety of employment opportunities in class as well as community. Students are instructed on task engagement, task completion, and practicing basic skills in a vocational setting. The tasks include cooking, office skills of copying, shredding, and laminating, recycling, and filling orders. The Cottage is a half day program with an am and pm class and with 8 students per class. The Cottage is located at the NEIU administration building at 1200 Line Street, Archbald.

Turning Point Academy

TPThe Turning Point Academy is the NEIU’s newest transition program. This program is a partnership between the NEIU and Lackawanna College. It is a full day transition program for students 18 – 21 years old with an IEP and the students can attend 1 or 2 years. The Turning Point is designed to assist students to prepare for competitive employment or post-secondary education. The students attend academic classes in a classroom a block away from Lackawanna College with a special education teacher and participate in various community based vocational training experiences throughout downtown Scranton. In the classroom, the students receive instruction in social skills, functional and financial math, functional literacy, and self-advocacy and determination skills. The students eat lunch on Lackawanna’s campus with college aged peers. The classroom is currently located in the IBEW Building at 431 Wyoming Ave, Scranton.